Putting Healthcare in Your Hands

April 9th, 2014

Join us on Friday, April 9 for a 12-1pm talk by Beenish Chaudhry entitled: “Putting Healthcare in Your Hands” in King 235.

Abstract: Our healthcare system is undergoing a seismic shift that is breaking the old information asymmetry – where doctors had all the information and patients had very little – now technology is being used to collect data to give patients an easy way to access key facts and gain knowledge for decisions about health. While we know how to target this information for the affluent and their lifestyles, what are we doing for those with low socioeconomic background? In this talk, you will learn about technology design challenges and solutions for this population, and what needs to be done in the future.

Women in STEM Faculty Panel

February 11th, 2014

Roots & STEM logoJoin professors Kate Jones-Smith (physics & astronomy), Chelsea Martinez (chemistry), Cynthia Taylor (computer science), and Leslie Kwakye (neuroscience) for a panel discussion on their careers in the sciences.

We invite scientists and non-scientists alike to attend and participate in what we hope will be an interesting, informative, and fun event.

When: Tuesday, February 11 at 4:45pm to 6:00pm

Where: Norman C. Craig Lecture Hall, Science Center

The session is part of the Roots & STEM events series exploring the human makeup of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

https://calendar.oberlin.edu/event/women_in_stem_panel_part_2

An Empirical View of DNS Complexity and Security

January 29th, 2014

Mark Allman, International Computer Science Institute will give a talk.  The Domain Name System (DNS) is a crucial piece of the Internet’s fabric, charged with mapping human-friendly names into network addresses.  This talk highlights several recent projects that aim to explore and understand how the modern DNS ecosystem has organically developed.  We will first tackle the complexity of the system and then illustrate how that complexity causes potential security vulnerabilities.  Finally, we will briefly sketch several possible mitigations to these security issues– which is the subject of ongoing work.

FEB. 11,  12:20 p.m. King 239 Refreshments will be served.

 

CSMC Presents "Python Night"

November 26th, 2013

Python logo
Peter F. and Dan B. will be hosting Python Night on Tuesday, December 3rd at 7pm.

Come an learn new tricks for programming in Python including:

  • list comprehensions
  • higher-order functions (+ map, filter, reduce)
  • sets and other useful data structures
  • with statements/context managers
  • decorators
  • the power of the python syntax
Now with Pizza!  RSVP via the form sent out by CSMC.  See you there!

 

Automated Identification of Text Message Author

November 12th, 2013

Matt Kretchmar, Denison University

Matt Kretchmar

On Thursday, November 14 there will be a talk by Dr. Matt Kretchmar of Denison University entitled Automated Identification of Text Message Authors: Was that really you who sent that text message?

Reception with light refreshments at 4:00pm in King 225, talk to follow at 4:30pm in King 239

Abstract: This talk is about the application of machine learning techniques to the problem of classifying authors of text messages. We use kernel-based support vector machines to build an automated classifier that uses statistical idiosyncrasies to distinguish one sender from others.

The talk is aimed at general undergraduate students in both mathematics and computer science.

Opportunities for Machine Learning in Ecological Science and Ecosystem Management

October 30th, 2013

Wednesday, November 6 NOON King 237

Thomas G. Dietterich of Oregon State University will present:

Opportunities for Machine Learning in Ecological Science and Ecosystem Management
How can computer science address the many challenges of managing the
earth's ecosystems sustainably?  Viewed as a control problem, ecosystem
management is challenging for two reasons. First, we lack good models
of the function and structure of the earth's ecosystems.
Second, it is difficult to compute optimal management policies because ecosystems
exhibit complex spatio-temporal interactions at multiple scales.

This talk will discuss some of the many challenges and opportunities
for machine learning research in computational sustainability. These
include sensor placement, data interpretation, model fitting,
computing robust optimal policies, and finally executing those
policies successfully.  I'll provide examples from current work
and discuss open problems in each of these areas.

All of these sustainability problems involve spatial modeling and
optimization, and all of them can be usefully conceived in terms of
facilitating or preventing flows along edges in spatial networks. For
example, encouraging the recovery of endangered species involves
creating a network of suitable habitat and encouraging spread along
the edges of the network. Conversely, preventing the spread of
diseases, invasive species, and pollutants involves preventing flow
along edges of networks.  Addressing these problems will require
advances in several areas of machine learning and optimization.

Study Abroad In Budapest

October 28th, 2013

Information Session for CSCI Majors  Thursday, Oct. 31

12:15-1:15 King 327  Food and Drinks Provided

Have your questions answered by Staff and Faculty FROM AIT.

For more information about the program visit www.ait-budapest.com

 

 

 

iSeeYou: Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED- RSVP required

September 30th, 2013

Monday Oct 7 Noon King 239  

Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED

Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED Modern computers contain a surprising number of processors distinct from the CPUs, each dedicated to a specific task. These processors along with their perhipherals form embedded systems inside standard desktop and laptop systems which are frequently overlooked when evaluating the security of computer systems. In this talk, I’ll describe a security analysis of one such embeddedsystem: the Apple iSight webcam. The iSight contains, as a privacy feature, an indicator LED which provides a visual cue that the camera is turned on. I’ll describe how the hardware that controls the LED can be bypassed, enabling video to be captured without any indication to the user. I’ll also show how the iSight can be leveraged by malware to break out of a Virtual Machine sandbox.

Stephen Checkoway, is an Assistant Research Professor in the Johns
Hopkins University Department of Computer Science and a member of the
Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute where he
teaches courses on computer security and software vulnerabilities. His
work includes security analyses of automotive emedded systems and
computer voting systems as well as offensive and defensive computer
security research. Checkoway earned bachelor’s degrees in mathematics
and computer sciences from the University of Washington in 2005 and a
Ph.D. in computer science in 2012 from the University of California,
San Diego.

RSVP in the CSCI office King 223 for Pizza lunch

 

Career Services Richard Berman Talks with CSCI Majors

September 24th, 2013

Monday NOVEMBER 4 Noon-1:00 p.m. King 325

RSVP Required. Sign up in the CSCI office King 223 for Pizza lunch.

  • Strategies for finding WT internships, summer jobs, and permanent jobs
  • What industries employe computer scientists
  • CS-related jobs that aren’t just software engineering
  • reaching out to CS alumni
  • deciding grad school vs. industry
  • How faculty/staff  @Oberlin can assist you

Vim/Emacs Night

October 10th, 2012

Vim and Emacs

Penguins love Vim and Emacs!

Vim and Emacs tutorial night — this Thursday, October 11 at 9pm in the downstairs lab (King 137)

Have you ever been programming in one of the CS labs and happen to see that the person next to you is coding in some kind of mysterious black window with wonderful, brightly coloured text everywhere? Do you admire how quickly and effortlessly they seem to be editing their files? Well, that mysterious and beautiful program is probably either Vim or Emacs! And you too could be dazzled with pretty colours and divided windows. You too could experience the joy of macros, meta keys and modes.

You’ll learn the basics of either Vim or Emacs — your choice.  We’ll walk you through a tutorial, give tips and pointers, and give you some exercises to complete at the end of the night.

Presented by the CSMC – now with cookies!